Press


Alice: End of Daze

"Theater pieces billed as multimedia often turn out to be regular plays with a couple of video projections tossed in. The Triple Shadow company’s “Alice:
End of Daze,” which takes its inspiration from Lewis Carroll’s “Through the Looking Glass,” is a true and often graceful blend of forms…The piece (at La MaMa E.T.C.)...
using music, dialogue that comes from actors
and puppets, and video that resembles art gallery installations...is no children's story, but a reminder of how often kiddie tales are nightmares about fleeting
time and death.”

 

Caryn James, New York Times


"Triple Shadow brings Alice’s colorful world – along
with the confusion it inspires – to multidimensional, thought-provoking life...The audience is brought into the young girl’s mind frame through spinning, morphing, and vanishing projections; characters that shrink and grow in size...consistently captivating.”

 

Ronni Rich, Backstage


“The music is performed live on stage during
the show; a refreshing taste compared to
many off-Broadway productions that choose
to generate the score in a studio and replay
it using a theater’s speaker system...While
dark and nightmare-inspiring, composer Edward Herbst's score is strikingly original...A visual and
audio feast for the mind, “Alice: End of Daze” takes
us to the brink of our imaginations.”


Nick Breault, Show Business Weekly

 

 

Encircling Tides


“...a nonverbal ecological opera of sound, shadow
and spirit that ranges from the chilling
to the cartoonish to the quietly transcendent.”


Mark Gevisser, The Village Voice


“Theater handcrafted from pure timeless
raw material...leaves me floating, rested,
purged, and high.”

 

Allen Kennedy, The Village Voice

 

Arctic Circle & Sea Change


“Imagine the Marx Brothers performing a
play written by Samuel Becket, directed by
David Lynch, and accompanied by the Throat
Singers of Tuva.”

 

Seth Rogovoy, WAMC Northeast Public Radio

 

“...at once disturbing, soothing
and beautiful; they speak a language
to children and adults alike. ”

 

Karen Shreefter, The Berkshire Courier

 

“In its use of masks and puppetry,
its visual textures and palette,
the ritual nature of its storytelling,
“Arctic Circle” resonates with the
voice of an ancient culture reaching
across a vast expanse of time to touch
this culture and society in ways
that are as new as they are old.”

 

Jeffrey Borak, The Berkshire Eagle

 

 

Earth, Fire, Water


“We are witness to an accumulation
of natural sounds and images which have
mysterious, mythic power... dazzling.”

 

David Sears, Involvement, New York Puppetry Guild


“Skinner and Herbst show great skill
at these techniques...approaching the
strange, grave beauty of their sources.”

 

Robert Massa, The Village Voice

 

Hoarfrost (Boston First Night)
 

“Even the most mundane of sites
was transformed into the mystical...”

 

Marjorie Pritchard, The Boston Globe